Oooh- don’t run, it’s bad for your knees.

They look at you as if you’re mad and say: “Oh I wouldn’t run, you’ll ruin your knees” or “I wouldn’t lift weights – it’s bad for you back”. …. And so they sit down in front of the tv with a “sharing” size packet of crisps and proceed to devour the lot. Before heading to the shops in a car, to buy more food- making sure it is low-fat, of course – because it is healthier while trying to stop you from doing the thing that might drag you out of a hole. People feel guilty for not engaging … Continue reading

Trampolines at the school gate

There have been a few blogs like this – less about what I know and more about some signposting to some people that are vastly more qualified to talk about it than me. I’ve just finished listening to a physio podcast about incontinence. Yes – we get all the exciting things to listen to. While I was aware of pelvic floor issues and how physio can help with issues regarding incontinence etc. what I was not aware of is the size of the problem nationally, the normalisation of it as “just something that happens” by pad manufacturers and the complete … Continue reading

Trapped nerves?

I’ve been delving into nerve pain and sciatica recently. One of the more accessible articles that has been published recently was by a Physio called Tom Jesson which differentiates between radiculopathy, referred pain and sciatica like symptoms.  The first important point he made was that this can be a confusing topic, both clinically and academically, so there is some work to be done to clear up some of the mixed messages.  Referred pain is a dull gnawing pain which is difficult to localise – which is quite often to do with mixed nerve messages to the brain. (it’s a bit … Continue reading

A short blog on muscular Back Pain

Having seen a few patients recently with Back Pain I’ve heard a fair few stories about what they have been told about the various ways they might be able to “fix” it. I thought now might be a good time to write a short blog about back pain problems, myths and the current state of physiotherapy thinking. NOTE: This is not meant to be a “be all and end all” of back pain – the debates and arguments about the veracity and validity of various methods etc have been floating around for as long as there has been back pain. … Continue reading

Enfeeblement and Robotic Legs

I’ve been seeing some things being bandied around on the internet recently – robotic exoskeletons to enable you to ski for longer and springs that you put behind your knees to enable you to stand up for less effort. I got a little incensed about this, mainly because of what they have in common – a lack of strength, continued atrophy of muscles, and the potential enfeeblement of the human body. (Don’t get me wrong – exoskeletons/replacement limbs for paraplegics and amputees are a good thing – I’m railing against something else here.) It might seem like a lovely idea … Continue reading

Magic hands?

Oooh I ache. I need a massage. Yes, massage and the myth of magic hands goes a long way. Sore muscles seem to know that the touch of a skilled therapist will help wipe away the fatigue and pain of long, hard sessions of training. Maybe even to the point of healing injuries and enabling the person to make a miraculous recovery, rising Lazarus like from the depths of injury to race-winning health within an hour. This, I regret to inform you, does not happen in the real world. No matter how magic you might think a person’s hands are, … Continue reading