What is a Turkish Get Up?

The Turkish Get Up (TGU) is an exercise which involves your whole body in a series of fluid movements, taking you from laying down to standing, and back down. It is an incredibly versatile exercise and worthy of a place in any training programme – either for warming up or as an exercise in it’s own right. The TGU is easily adaptable to suit different levels of fitness, flexibility and strength. Over time it can improve each of these aspects and in performing TGUs you will also be promoting both upper and lower body stability. Because your arm is held … Continue reading

H is for Habits

Definition: An acquired behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary. Habits…we all have them, even if we don’t realise it. They are the things which shape us, create the person we are, the body we have and the mental attitude we hold. They are behavioural routines which tend to be unconscious and often (apparently) very difficult to alter. As we all know, habits can be positive or negative, and often it is the mental battle to change from negative to positive which defeats us. One recurring area we deal with at Global Therapies relates to postural habits. … Continue reading

E is for Epicondylitis

Introduction Epicondylitis is an overuse injury of the elbow. When the lateral (outside) structures are affected the condition is more commonly known as Tennis Elbow (or lateral epicondylitis) and when medial (inside) structures are affected it is known as Golfer’s Elbow (no prizes for guessing this is medial epicondylitis). What is Epicondylitis and why does it happen? The main difference between medial and lateral epicondylitis is which specific structures around the elbow suffer from overuse, injury or irritation. Lateral – the main area of concern are the extensors muscles of the hand which attach to the lateral epicondyle (a bony … Continue reading

C is for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What is this condition? Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a condition where the median nerve (the one which innervates your thumb, first three fingers and half of the fourth finger) is compressed as it passes through the tunnel of bones and soft tissues at the wrist. Swelling around the wrist or flexor tendons can be contributing factors; pressure is placed on the nerve as it passes through the tunnel. Fluid retention during pregnancy or obesity can increase the risk of this condition because the size of the tunnel is reduced, again, putting pressure on the nerve. The other major contributing factor … Continue reading