Marathon time

Ah – February. Marathon training schedules rule the roost. People counting miles, gradually building up the distance. Niggles appear, cold and flu rear their ugly heads, they get ignored, sometimes they disappear, but sometimes they grow more and more insistent. Occasional days get missed, sometimes a week but still the schedule grinds on. Some people, having not got on the bandwagon a month ago are now looking to start an “accelerated” marathon programme- get fit for 26 miles in less than 3 months. Yes. It’s February. Soon enough it will be March, the mornings are slowly getting brighter, runs will … Continue reading

Physician- Heal Thyself – a fairly long one – I must apologise.

There is a lot of information out there about Janda’s “Lower Cross Syndrome” – It is characterised by anterior hip tilt and an increased lumbar lordosis. According to what you read, this may – or indeed, may not lead to lower back pain or other musculoskeletal problems. The fact that this syndrome led to pain was a fairly well accepted theory for many years and a lot of physiotherapy was focused on remedying this anterior hip tilt through the stretching of “tight” hip flexors and strengthening of the “weak” or “loose” core and somewhat amnesiac glutes. (How, exactly do glutes … Continue reading

DNS or DNF?

Did Not Start or Did Not Finish? This is a question that I think about a fair amount in terms of runners and cyclists that have been injured. When you have a race coming up, get injured training for it, or just generally in the run up to the big event, what do you do? Try and fudge through – start and see what happens, gambling on finishing and potentially making things a lot worse, with more time off and rehab afterward, of taking a DNS on the chin and getting on with rehab and training? I’ve been there myself, … Continue reading

Training vs Rest

The problem with training hard for any sport is that once you get to a certain point, you aren’t necessarily getting healthier. You may be getting fitter, but healthy? Perhaps not. Alongside this, the warning signs are there, but are mainly ignored. As athletes we know that training again and again, putting ourselves back into the hole, is the best way to adapt, to become better, faster and more competitive. When we finally over-reach ourselves, something gives. Something breaks. Our ability to compete, or even train, goes down and we are faced with potentially a long, slow road to recovery. … Continue reading

Top 5 Recovery Methods

Recovery is so important for anyone who exercises, regardless of the volume and intensity. The key is to not think that “recovery” means “complete rest”. One hour in the gym or running then sitting down on your backside for the remaining 167 hours in the week is not a good recipe for your overall health and well-being. When we say recovery, we mean things you can do to improve your chances of coming back to the activity stronger, being fitter, preventing injury, improving your overall health, and maximizing the time you do spend lifting weights/running or whatever activity you do. … Continue reading

Coping with Injury

Perhaps this is a good time to talk about injuries and coping with them, and maybe, how not to re-injure yourself through coming back too quickly. The reason for this is because I recently had my first DNF in a fell race, through an impact injury with a rock. A few days later, my knee was still pretty swollen, I couldn’t bend it so well… In fact I could barely walk up stairs. It was going to be a good couple of weeks, if not more, before I could actually get out to run, cycle, or even get on the rowing machine. … Continue reading