Hip flexor / adductor problem…?

Last August I ran Cracken Edge Fell Race. On the way down the final hill into the finish, I really let go and hammered it as hard as I could. It felt amazing just to run that fast. However, that was the beginning of something that has plagued me for quite a while. The day after the race I woke up with a pain in my lower abs/upper leg, like a muscle strain, but not quite. It was difficult to sit up to get out of bed and I found myself rolling over to drop onto the floor as an … Continue reading

Q is for Quadriceps

As the name would imply, the quadriceps muscle group has four muscles: rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. These muscles are what we commonly know as our thigh muscles, and are responsible for extending the knee (i.e. straightening the lower leg) – and also providing a braking force when running downhill or stopping suddenly. Rectus femoris also flexes the hip – as it attaches to the pelvis (at the anterior inferior iliac spine). Rectus femoris and vastus intermedius are situated down the central portion of your thigh and act on the knee centrally with power when extending … Continue reading

H is for Habits

Definition: An acquired behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary. Habits…we all have them, even if we don’t realise it. They are the things which shape us, create the person we are, the body we have and the mental attitude we hold. They are behavioural routines which tend to be unconscious and often (apparently) very difficult to alter. As we all know, habits can be positive or negative, and often it is the mental battle to change from negative to positive which defeats us. One recurring area we deal with at Global Therapies relates to postural habits. … Continue reading

Cramp

What is it? Excruciating. That’s what. Out running last week and my left calf decided to cramp. I knew I needed to stop…not much choice really…and stretch out the muscles. But why it was happening is another thing, which I’ll come to later. Back to the what. Well, it is an intensely painful sensation caused by a sudden onset of involuntary muscle contractions or severe muscle shortening. What essentially is happening is an acute muscle spasm. This forces the blood out of the muscle: this is bad, it means oxygen and nutrients aren’t getting to where they should be. Lack … Continue reading

Healing muscle strains – Treatment

As mentioned in a post earlier this month (Processes involved in healing a muscle strain) what treatment aims to do initially in a muscle strain is to reduce pain, swelling, bleeding and secondary tissue damage by utilising PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation). At the acute stage treatment is, as mentioned, to follow the PRICE protocol. You should immediately stop the activity which caused or aggravated the injury. Protect the area, limit movement either with bandages or splints and keep it away from danger. From the perspective of a massage therapist you may think that there is little that … Continue reading

Processes involved in healing a muscle strain

The first aim of treatment in healing a muscle strain is to reduce pain, swelling, bleeding and secondary tissue damage by utilising PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation). Encouraging circulation, after the acute stage, through gentle massage lymphatic drainage can help recovery. There are three stages to healing a muscle strain: inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling. Inflammatory: this is the body’s reaction to the injury and preparation for the repair phases. The inflammation stage is when the immune system increases circulation to the injury site, with the aim of producing edema (swelling). Pain will be felt at the site, which … Continue reading